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MULTIMEDIA

TRANSFORMING DREAMS

 | New Hope Community staff members     chase their future dreams

New Hope Community's Staff Recognition Dinner awarded not only it's employees time spent at New Hope but also recognized the dreams that those employees are still chasing and transforming every day. 

 PARKING ON SUNY NEW PALTZ CAMPUS

 | How Do You Feel About the Parking On     Campus

Students were interviewed about their reactions to the parking situation on the SUNY New Paltz campus. The video was filmed and produced by Mae Bonnaci for Video of the Week on The Little Rebellion's online publication.

NEW FANGLED

OLD FASHIONED 

COCKTAIL RECIPE

 | New Fangled Old Fashioned
   Cocktail Recipe​

The Fangled Old Fashioned Cocktail Recipe was a video created about a new take on an Old Fashioned done by Black Dirt Distilling for WRRV. The video was filmed by Digital Media Editor Jackie Corley. The video was edited by Mae Bonnaci

Unity Sand
Unity Sand

The Blending of the Sand Ceremony is a tradition to which the bride and groom go pick sand from one of their favorite places and set the sand in small vases. As each guest walks into the wedding each pinch sand for the family they are with and fill the vases. This sand is used later on to blend together and recognize the unity of both families.

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Seating Arrangements
Seating Arrangements

Matt Berger, Cousin to the groom, Edward Boyles, would patiently seat each incoming guest as was requested. He would watch to make sure they fulfilled their obligation to pinch sand and place it in the vase. He kept watch to make sure that family was seated before the public.

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Congratulations
Congratulations

Caitlin and Edward gave there hugs and thanked everyone for coming. Now it was time to head out. Guests threw paper airplanes at them and cheered as the descended the church steps. Hand in hand supporting each other each step down.

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Unity Sand
Unity Sand

The Blending of the Sand Ceremony is a tradition to which the bride and groom go pick sand from one of their favorite places and set the sand in small vases. As each guest walks into the wedding each pinch sand for the family they are with and fill the vases. This sand is used later on to blend together and recognize the unity of both families.

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MR. AND MRS. ED BOYLES

 | Mr. and Mrs. Ed Boyles

In today’s day and age people reach their late twenties to thirties before getting married, if they even get married at all. Marriage rates have been slowly dropping for the last eight years. With only 38% of women aged 25 getting married. But, in the small upstate town of Bethel, NY two young adults, Caitlin Buldoc and Edward Boyles both aged 25, would become Mr. and Mrs. Edward Boyles. The church would run out of seats as half of the town arrived to watch these two love birds tie the knot. The town of Bethel is not a small town but once you are born there everyone knows you. So, when the day comes for two locals to get married; family, friends, and everyone that watched these two grow up would come to witness. The pastor made the wedding open to the public and not a seat was empty. 

RESCUE

SERVICES

Heroes
Heroes

Small towns do not have paid rescue services like larger cities. Mainly because they cannot afford them and because there are not enough calls in a year. Small towns rely on volunteers who choose to risk their lives for the people in their town, because their home is worth protecting.

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Gear Up
Gear Up

Charlie Stackhouse pulls on his gear as quick as possible to go out on a fire call. They start with the boots and work their way up, jump in the truck and head out. That way they are already fully prepared when they got on scene.

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911
911

Matthew Goldsmith works full time for the 911 call while being the president of the Kauneonga fire department and a Bethel EMT volunteer. When he is at the 911 center, if he gets a call in his fire departments jurisdiction he is not allowed to leave work and lead his men. He must stay at the call center.

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Heroes
Heroes

Small towns do not have paid rescue services like larger cities. Mainly because they cannot afford them and because there are not enough calls in a year. Small towns rely on volunteers who choose to risk their lives for the people in their town, because their home is worth protecting.

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 | Rescue Services

Most small towns rely on volunteers to build their fire departments and EMT squads. They train through rigorous courses and in depth classes to fully understand the roles in which they are about to take part in. 89 percent of NYS fire departments are volunteers and with White Lake Fire Department, Kauneongua Fire Department and Bethel EMTs combined there are only about 350 calls a year. IT becomes hard for volunteers to participate in every call because they work full time jobs; since most small town can not afford the salaries and benefits that come from paid rescue services.

Without volunteers residents of small towns would need to rely on the next town over for their rescue services. When this is the case, the arrival time of services ends up getting extended. When it comes to rescue services even a 5 minute arrival time difference means the difference between life and death. 

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